How technology leaders can turn children into superpowers

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<pre><pre>How technology leaders can turn children into superpowers


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Consider these facts: Center for Disease Control and Prevention Appreciated that in 2016 around 9% of US children were diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. And after one study As of 2012, the "total annual cost of ADHD in the United States was $ 143 to $ 266 billion due to the economic impact of ADHD on children and adults." ON time The article also noted that between 2003 and 2007 the number of diagnosed ADHD children from families living in poverty increased by 60%.

The American Pediatric Academy Guidelines recommends treating behavioral therapy with ADHD first before trying ADHD medication. ADHD drugs work in 70% of the cases, but they can cause a number of side effects, such as trouble sleeping and loss of appetite. Medications relieve symptoms of ADHD, but are not a cure. The symptoms reappear as soon as a child stops taking the medicine. On the other hand, behavioral therapies teach and develop the skills of managers that will benefit them as they grow up. However, they require a lot of work and commitment from the parents. In summary, you usually have two options: prescribe medication or seek expensive behavioral therapy.

I believe that technology can help children with ADHD by simplifying the whole process and using data to provide evidence-based treatments. The technology could expand access to ADHD treatments, improve their efficiency and lower overall costs.

My company has developed a smartwatch for children that they can use to set routines. For example, imagine a portable device equipped with multiple sensors to monitor physical and emotional health could help a child with ADHD. The device could monitor the daily routine and incorporate observations of the child's support system (e.g. his or her parents, teachers, etc.). The data could be analyzed by artificial intelligence to provide evidence-based treatment recommendations (with approval and regularly) (of course, follow-up by a behavioral analyst certified by the board). This is just one example of how I believe Tech can tailor treatments for children remotely.

And from my point of view it is not impossible. In 2019, the American Medical Association created three new current procedural terminology codes to promote remote patient monitoring (codes 99453, 99454, 99457). I have no doubt that it is now a matter of months before startups can use these new billing codes.

Other health sectors are already seeing the benefits of using assistive technology. For example, text-to-speech and word prediction improve the lives of millions of children with disabilities around the world. Networked blood glucose meters and personalized knowledge improve the lives of children with diabetes. Networked blood pressure monitors and distance learning help every day to save people with high blood pressure.

Every time technology leaders develop devices for children, they must ensure that every "treatment" is done in a safe environment. The success of these new “extended” treatments depends on the trust of the parents.

Therefore, make sure that the data you use is compatible with HIPAA, COPPA and FERPA. If you are creating portable devices, they must be Class II FDA 510 (k) compliant and approved as Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM). Given the recent updates in the process to get this approval, it's now completely within reach for startups. My recommendation is to work with specialists who have proven success in applying for admission. You save time and money. These specialists implement the quality management system you need and guide you through the entire process.

As parents trust technology more and more, data science continues to improve, and the penetration rate of smartphones and wearables is high, I believe we are at the beginning of a revolution in the treatment of ADHD and a number of other health problems in children. We have all the ingredients to turn them into superpowers, so health technicians: ready, set, go.

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Consider these facts: The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that in 2016, around 9% of US children were diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. According to a 2012 study of the economic impact of ADHD on children and adults in the United States, the "total annual cost of ADHD was between $ 143 and $ 266 billion." ON time The article also noted that between 2003 and 2007 the number of diagnosed ADHD children from families living in poverty increased by 60%.

The American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines recommend treating ADHD with behavioral therapy before trying ADHD medication. ADHD medications work in 70% of cases, but can cause a number of side effects such as sleep disorders and loss of appetite. Medications relieve symptoms of ADHD, but are not a cure. The symptoms reappear as soon as a child stops taking the medicine. On the other hand, behavioral therapies teach and develop the skills of managers that will benefit them as they grow up. However, they require a lot of work and commitment from the parents. In summary, you usually have two options: prescribe medication or seek expensive behavioral therapy.

I believe that technology can help children with ADHD by simplifying the whole process and using data to provide evidence-based treatments. The technology could expand access to ADHD treatments, improve their efficiency and lower overall costs.

My company has developed a smartwatch for children that they can use to set routines. For example, imagine a portable device equipped with multiple sensors to monitor physical and emotional health could help a child with ADHD. The device could monitor the daily routine and incorporate observations of the child's support system (e.g. his or her parents, teachers, etc.). The data could be analyzed by artificial intelligence to provide evidence-based treatment recommendations (with approval and regularly) (of course, follow-up by a behavioral analyst certified by the board). This is just one example of how I believe Tech can tailor treatments for children remotely.

And from my point of view it is not impossible. In 2019, the American Medical Association created three new current procedural terminology codes to promote remote patient monitoring (codes 99453, 99454, 99457). I have no doubt that it is now a matter of months before startups can use these new billing codes.

Other health sectors are already seeing the benefits of using assistive technology. For example, text-to-speech and word prediction improve the lives of millions of children with disabilities around the world. Networked blood glucose meters and personalized knowledge improve the lives of children with diabetes. Networked blood pressure monitors and distance learning help every day to save people with high blood pressure.

Every time technology leaders develop devices for children, they must ensure that every "treatment" is done in a safe environment. The success of these new “extended” treatments depends on the trust of the parents.

Therefore, make sure that the data you use is compatible with HIPAA, COPPA and FERPA. If you are creating portable devices, they must be Class II FDA 510 (k) compliant and approved as Remote Patient Monitoring (RPM). Given the recent updates in the process to get this approval, it's now completely within reach for startups. My recommendation is to work with specialists who have proven success in applying for admission. You save time and money. These specialists implement the quality management system you need and guide you through the entire process.

As parents trust technology more and more, data science continues to improve, and the penetration rate of smartphones and wearables is high, I believe we are at the beginning of a revolution in the treatment of ADHD and a number of other health problems in children. We have all the ingredients to turn them into superpowers, i.e. health tech entrepreneurs: ready, set, go.