Read technology surveys

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Technology providers love surveys. It is difficult to find a technology specialist who has not, at one point or another, conducted a market study to compile "results" that are intended to give industry insights in one direction or another.

The challenge here is that IT surveys are usually used to analyze a specific segment or a specific market niche or to solve a specific problem with the technology platform. But even if they are carried out "independently" (by analyst firms or special research companies), there is obviously a general tendency towards the core interests of the company that pays for the work.

So how should we separate that? Wheat from the chaff?

In almost all cases there is clearly a certain attraction to bring the surveys closer to a company's market interests. To get out of the technology for a moment, we don't find any cake bakeries that do studies on the oil and gas industry. Cake specialists (if they conduct surveys) want to know which color is selling best and analyze which month is the most profitable for birthday celebrations.

Logically, database providers would like to inform us about database trends, storage providers about data lakes and cloud providers about IT optimization trends, etc. The question is whether they can do this (in the form of a survey) without providing an overly elaborate information analysis based on “loaded” questions aimed at achieving a self-serving result.

survey immateriality

To know what to look for in a technology survey, we first ask what you shouldn't be looking for, or at least what you shouldn't be focusing on. When a data warehouse modernization specialist publishes a survey that reveals that data refresh and rejuvenation procedures are required in modern analytics environments, you can be sure not to consider the whole thing as a gospel.

If a well-known technology giant with an interest in artificial intelligence (AI) publishes a survey that shows that business interest in AI is increasing by 34.9% (or some other over-specific measure), this could be a hope more human intelligence. When a leading data storage brand conducts a survey on data storage security vulnerabilities, you can grab a pinch of salt.

The list goes on … You get the picture.

A lower one is a louder one

If you find that your inbox is regularly flooded with technical surveys, take a deep breath and read a little further down in the subtext what is presented.

This technique is not foolproof, and sometimes even the details presented in an average technical survey are not too far from summarizing the astonishingly obvious. For example…

Survey shows AI is on the rise, but skills shortages and lack of trust among employees in automation technologies are still important issues – don't you say? Surveys suggest the benefits of cloud applications can save money, but only if a holistic approach to platform-wide technical updates is used to avoid IT silos – astonishingly, but actually true. Survey found that microservices, containers and serverless technologies (all the current darlings of the technology world) are the most important drivers for technology change in 2020 – close the front door, how did you do it?

Supplementary supplements

Sometimes, however, the tastiest bites can be found in the survey content, which the provider presented as a complementary side table.

In recent survey examples, a specialist in modernizing data warehouses found that the core mechanics of Extract, Transform & amp; Load (ETL) process to get data from one place to another, which turns out to be the biggest challenge in daily operations. A specialist for application programming interfaces (simply put: software glue that connects various services and / or pieces of code) found that half of the APIs used by the software departments were developed internally, a third is only developed by the integration partners and the rest shared used are public. Hmm, where the software mechanics come from, has a very interesting effect on the way it is used. A managed services provider (who published a survey that found that the use of managed services providers is increasingly in demand – no, frankly) also found that IT diagnostics is an important way to get around understand how software systems should be modernized. Did the company run with the diagnostic angle? We don't have to answer that, do we?

These IT survey inserts rarely make the headlines, but they're often the kind of thing that really explains how trends are moving. Nobody goes to a restaurant to order a plate of bread rolls and an order with cauliflower (and if I do, I apologize profusely), but the substance can often be found here.

“It all started to go wrong when the cost of managing a survey dropped substantially to zero with the introduction of online survey tools. When conducting surveys costs money, people invest in the right design and now often do unprecedented things like testing before general release. Nowadays, they are too often hacked together by a young member of a marketing team – and if at all planned – to find the answers the sponsor first thought of. " Matt Ballentine, a sociology student with experience in survey design, is currently working as head of technology and transformation RHP Group, a UK based nonprofit housing management company.

Our survey said

How or loathe them, we will see numerous technology surveys this year and the next ten years.

Pay attention to the too specific results of the percentage analysis, i. H. If the interest in managed services according to the company xyz in Albania has increased by 18.7%, why did you look for such a trend? Pay attention to the obvious, self-serving agenda … and it's so pervasive that we don't need an example. You might also want to watch out for surveys with too many “results,” H. These analyzes should at best serve as trend suggestions.

Finally, pay attention to the rolls and other tasty side dishes and maybe make one occasionally Cauliflower sandwich go.

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Technology providers love surveys. It is difficult to find a technology specialist who has not, at one point or another, conducted a market study to compile "results" that are intended to give industry insights in one direction or another.

The challenge here is that IT surveys are usually used to analyze a specific segment or a specific market niche or to solve a specific problem with the technology platform. But even if they are carried out "independently" (by analyst firms or special research companies), there is obviously a general tendency towards the core interests of the company that pays for the work.

So how should we separate the wheat from the chaff?

In almost all cases there is clearly a certain attraction to bring the surveys closer to a company's market interests. To get out of the technology for a moment, we don't find any cake bakeries that do studies on the oil and gas industry. Cake specialists (if they conduct surveys) want to know which color is selling best and analyze which month is the most profitable for birthday celebrations.

Logically, database providers would like to inform us about database trends, storage providers about data lakes and cloud providers about IT optimization trends, etc. The question is whether they can do this (in the form of a survey) without providing an overly elaborate information analysis based on “loaded” questions aimed at achieving a self-serving result.

survey immateriality

To know what to look for in a technology survey, we first ask what you shouldn't be looking for, or at least what you shouldn't be focusing on. When a data warehouse modernization specialist publishes a survey that reveals that data refresh and rejuvenation procedures are required in modern analytics environments, you can be sure not to consider the whole thing as a gospel.

If a well-known technology giant with an interest in artificial intelligence (AI) publishes a survey that shows that business interest in AI is increasing by 34.9% (or some other over-specific measure), this could be a hope more human intelligence. When a leading data storage brand conducts a survey on data storage security vulnerabilities, you can grab a pinch of salt.

The list goes on … You get the picture.

A lower one is a louder one

If you find that your inbox is regularly flooded with technical surveys, take a deep breath and read a little further down in the subtext what is presented.

This technique is not foolproof, and sometimes even the details presented in an average technical survey are not too far from summarizing the astonishingly obvious. For example…

Survey shows AI is on the rise, but skills shortages and lack of trust among employees in automation technologies are still important issues – don't you say? Surveys suggest the benefits of cloud applications can save money, but only if a holistic approach to platform-wide technical updates is used to avoid IT silos – astonishingly, but actually true. Survey found that microservices, containers and serverless technologies (all the current darlings of the technology world) are the most important drivers for technology change in 2020 – close the front door, how did you do it?

Supplementary supplements

Sometimes, however, the tastiest bites can be found in the survey content, which the provider presented as a complementary side table.

In recent survey examples, a specialist in data warehouse modernization found that it is actually the core mechanics of the ETL (Extract, Transform & Load) process of transferring data from one place to another, which turns out to be the biggest daily challenge of operations. A specialist for application programming interfaces (simply put: software glue that connects various services and / or pieces of code) found that half of the APIs used by the software departments were developed internally, a third is only developed by the integration partners and the rest shared used are public. Hmm, where the software mechanics come from, has a very interesting effect on the way it is used. A managed services provider (who published a survey that found that the use of managed services providers is increasingly in demand – no, frankly) also found that IT diagnostics is an important way to get around understand how software systems should be modernized. Did the company run with the diagnostic angle? We don't have to answer that, do we?

These IT survey inserts rarely make the headlines, but they're often the kind of thing that really explains how trends are moving. Nobody goes to a restaurant to order a plate of bread rolls and an order with cauliflower (and if I do, I apologize profusely), but here you can often find the substance.

“It all started to go wrong when the cost of managing a survey dropped substantially to zero with the introduction of online survey tools. When conducting surveys costs money, people invest in the right design and now often do unprecedented things like testing before general release. Too often these days they are hacked together by a young member of a marketing team – if at all planned – to find the answers the sponsor first thought of, "said Matt Ballentine, a sociology student with experience in survey design, currently head of technology and transformation at RHP Group, a UK-based nonprofit housing management company.

Our survey said

How or loathe them, we will see numerous technology surveys this year and the next ten years.

Pay attention to the too specific percentage analysis results, i. H. If the interest in managed services according to the company xyz in Albania has increased by 18.7%, why did you look for such a trend? Pay attention to the obvious, self-serving agenda … and it's so pervasive that we don't need an example. You might also want to watch out for surveys with too many “results,” H. These analyzes should at best serve as trend suggestions.

Finally, pay attention to the rolls and other tasty side dishes and maybe make a cauliflower sandwich to take with you occasionally.