The best coffee machines for 2020: Bonavita, Ninja, Oxo, Moccamaster and more – CNET

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<pre><pre>The best coffee machines for 2020: Bonavita, Ninja, Oxo, Moccamaster and more - CNET

In theory, Drip coffeemakers are absolutely simple machines. You give them reasonsBeat them with hot water and then let gravity and time do the rest. It just sounds but it is not, Most Drain the coffee Manufacturers fail miserably on this basic task – some because they don't get enough water or brew too slowly. Others overcompensate and scald their soils completely. Only a few filter coffee machines have what it takes The finest drip coffee,

There are notable exceptions, and whether you prefer to make iced coffee, perfect lattes, or freshly ground coffee, you don't have to spend mint to get the best coffee machine. You can drop over $ 600 on a tricked one Ratio eight that is as beautiful as it is capable. But all you need is $ 15 to get Oxo's splendor Pour single serve over Funnel.

Continue reading: The best espresso machines for 2020

There are many convincing options in between. One of the winners of our editor’s choice is the Bonavita connoisseurs, our choice for the best all-round brewing machine. Another is that KitchenAid siphon Brewerwho used an old technique to get excellent and dramatic results. Regardless of your budget, there is something on this list that fits your drip needs perfectly and is the best coffee machine for you. We promise you will never have to drink coffee from pods again.

Chris Monroe / CNET

Despite its refined name, the Connavisseur from Bonavita is the best automatic filter coffee machine that you can buy for little money. It reliably brews full pots of good coffee that can keep up with those of your favorite cafe or barista, and it's a breeze to use. With its simple one-touch operation, the Bonavita has a 1,500 watt heating element that maintains an optimal brewing temperature of 198 to 205 degrees Fahrenheit.

This perfect coffee maker also has a 1.3 liter water tank, works quickly and has all the frills, including a stainless steel-lined thermal carafe. With a removable, dishwasher-safe filter basket and a carafe lid, it can also be kept clean quickly.

Tyler Lizenby / CNET

If you find that brewing a whole pot of coffee every morning is too much, consider the Bonavita Immersion Dripper. This small device is perfect for a cup of strong, aromatic Joe. All you have to do is supply the hot water and coffee filters.

Read our Bonavita Immersion Dripper Test.

If you are in a hurry, you will love the fast brewing cycle of this drip machine. The Bunn Velocity Brew BT drip coffee machine with its stainless steel-lined thermal carafe whips large pots at astonishing speed. In just 3 minutes and 33 seconds, the coffee machine can dispense full batches of delicious drops.

Read our Bunn Velocity Brew BT test.

Tyler Lizenby / CNET

The unique combination of spectacle and quality of the KitchenAid Siphon Brewer is hard to beat. The coffee is extremely rich, deep and seductive in taste. The vintage brewing method, which is based on steam pressure and vacuum extraction, is also fascinating. No paper filters required as the Siphon Brewer comes with a reusable stainless steel filter.

Read our Kitchenaid Siphon Coffee Brewer review.

Chris Monroe / CNET

Think of this kitchen appliance as the Swiss Army Knife of the world of filter coffee machines. The programmable ninja brewer (with nozzle, thermal carafe and reusable filter) offers an uncanny degree of flexibility. It can create anything from firm drip to perfect cold brew, iced coffee to latte-style drinks with milk frother, and the temperature is adjusted according to your choice. The thermal carafe keeps tea or coffee hot for up to two hours. You can even make iced and hot coffee in different sizes, from small cups, mugs, travel mugs to half and full carafes.

Read our Ninja Hot and Cold Brewed System Review.

Chris Monroe / CNET

Cold brewed coffee is delicious, but can be painful. The Oxo cold brewing device takes most of the headache out of the process. It saturates the soil evenly and lets you drain cold coffee from it relatively easily.

Read our Oxo Cold Brew Coffee Maker review.

Tyler Lizenby / CNET

Great tasting drop from a product that only costs $ 15? It sounds unlikely, but that's exactly what the affordable Oxo Good Grips Pour-Over offers. Only one drink of coffee is prepared at a time, and you must provide the hot water. Nevertheless, the simple brewer transforms the otherwise complex task of pouring over into a simple, clean and almost child's play.

Read our Oxo Good Grips Pour-Over Coffee Maker test.

Tyler Lizenby / CNET

Based on the Ratio Eight device, the people at Ratio believe that coffee machines should be both beautiful and functional. Starting at $ 495, each brewery is made from a selection of high quality materials such as walnut, mahogany and glass. (Both the water container and the carafe are made of blown glass.) The robust aluminum floors are also available in numerous designs. And yes, the ratio eight also makes an excellent drop.

Read our Ratio Eight Test.

Megan Wollerton / CNET

The Dutch company Technivorm has been selling exceptionally good filter coffee machines for decades. The Moccamaster KBT 741 has a design from 1968, the first Moccamaster store. Apart from the retro design, the Moccamaster KBT 741 always delivers perfect, freshly brewed coffee that satisfies coffee connoisseurs. The stainless steel thermal carafe keeps the contents hot for six hours.

Read our Technivorm Moccamaster KBT 741 review.

A note on testing coffee machines

Assessing the performance of a coffee machine is more difficult than it sounds. The first step is to know what good filter coffee is. According to the Specialty Coffee Association, there are criteria that are critical to brewing Java quality. These are mainly brewing time and water temperature. Hot water should not come into contact with the soil for less than four minutes and no longer than eight minutes. In addition, the ideal water temperature range is between 92 ° C and 96 ° C.

To confirm how each coffee machine faces this challenge, we log the length of its brewing cycles. We also use thermocouple heat sensors connected to industrial data loggers. This allows us to record the temperature in the coffee grounds during the brewing process.

We measure the temperature in the brewing chamber of every coffee machine that we test.

Brian Bennett / CNET

After the coffee has been brewed, samples of the coffee liquid produced are taken with an optical refractometer. If we take into account the amount of water and freshly ground coffee, we can use this data to calculate the percentage of total dissolved solids for each brew. From there we come to the extraction percentage. The ideal range is usually assumed to be between 18 and 20%.

We also secure the measured data with a good, old-fashioned taste test. If the taste of the coffee is bitter, there is a good chance that it has been over-extracted. At the other end, the extracted coffee usually tastes weak – it can even taste sour or taste like moist peanuts. And to be sure, we brew identical test runs at least three times to get average results.

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Originally released and updated last year as we repeat new products.